climate people street crowd
Photo by Markus Spiske on Pexels.com
/

How We’re Lowering the Chances of Climate Change Nightmares

Start

It’s no secret that climate change is real, and it’s happening right now. The effects are already felt by humans and the natural world alike. But the situation will only worsen if we don’t take action.

But it’s not all doom and gloom; there are things we can do to lower the chances of climate change-related nightmare scenarios from becoming a reality. Here’s a look at some of the things we’re doing to mitigate the impacts.

by David Stone

climate sign outside blur
Photo by Markus Spiske on Pexels.com

Switching to renewable energy sources

The first and most obvious way to lower our carbon footprint is to switch from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources.

This is something individuals, businesses, and governments alike can do, and it’s already starting to happen on a large scale.

According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), the share of renewables in global power generation increased from 16.6% in 2010 to 26.3% in 2018. What’s more, IRENA estimates that renewables will make up almost 80% of global power generation by 2050

The Most Promising Renewable Energy Sources

  1. Solar Energy
    Solar energy is one of the most popular renewable energy sources. Solar panels convert sunlight into electricity, which can be used to power homes and businesses. Solar energy is a clean and emissions-free source of energy, making it an attractive option for those looking to reduce their carbon footprint.
  2. Wind Energy
    Wind energy is another popular renewable energy source. Wind turbines convert the kinetic energy of wind into electricity, which can be used to power homes and businesses. Wind energy is a clean and emissions-free source of energy, making it an attractive option for those looking to reduce their carbon footprint.
  3. Hydroelectric Energy
    Hydroelectric energy is a type of renewable energy that uses water to generate electricity. Hydroelectric dams harness the power of moving water to generate electricity, which can be used to power homes and businesses. Hydroelectric energy is a clean and emissions-free source of energy, making it an attractive option for those looking to reduce their carbon footprint.
  4. Geothermal Energy
    Geothermal energy is a type of renewable energy that uses heat from the earth to generate electricity. Geothermal power plants harness the heat from the earth’s core to generate electricity, which can be used to power homes and businesses. Geothermal energy is a clean and emissions-free source of energy, making it an attractive option for those looking to reduce their carbon footprint.
  5. Biomass Energy
    Biomass energy is a type of renewable energy that uses organic materials to generate electricity. Biomass power plants burn organic materials, such as wood or agricultural waste, to generate electricity, which can be used to power homes and businesses. Biomass energy is a clean and emissions-free source of energy, making it an attractive option for those looking to reduce their carbon footprint.
  6. Nuclear Energy
    Nuclear Energy is a type of renewable energy that uses nuclear fission to generate electricity. Nuclear power plants use nuclear fission to generate electricity, which can be used to power homes and businesses. Nuclear Energy is a clean and emissions-free source of energy, making it an attractive option for those looking to reduce their carbon

Planting trees

Trees are nature’s way of sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. So it stands to reason that planting more trees would help offset our greenhouse gas emissions.

And that’s exactly what many countries are doing; China, for example, has planted over 40 billion trees in the past decade in an effort to combat climate change.

Developing alternative materials

One of the main sources of greenhouse gas emissions is the production of cement. It’s responsible for around 7% of global emissions.

However, there are alternatives to traditional cement being developed that have a much lower carbon footprint.

One such material is geopolymer concrete, made from industrial waste products like fly ash or slag. Tiles are also made from recycled glass or plastic, further reducing emissions from concrete production.

Electric Vehicles Gaining traction

AD.

Another area where we are seeing progress is in the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs). EVs are much more efficient than traditional gasoline-powered cars, and they produce zero emissions when driven.

According to BloombergNEF, there were just over 2 million EVs on the road in 2018. This may not seem like a lot, but it represents a 38% increase from 2017.

What’s more, EV sales are expected to continue growing rapidly. BloombergNEF estimates that there will be 56 million EVs on the road by 2040.

Falling prices drive the growth; the cost of lithium-ion batteries has fallen by 85% since 2010.

Improving agricultural practices

Agriculture is responsible for around 10% of global greenhouse gas emissions, making it a major contributor to climate change.

However, there are ways to produce food that minimize these emissions. For example, no-till farming minimizes soil disturbance, which helps keep carbon in the ground rather than released into the atmosphere.

Additionally, planting cover crops can help sequester carbon dioxide and improve soil health.

Lessening Climate Change Disaster Scenarios

These are just some examples of the progress made in the fight against climate change.

There are other areas where efforts are beginning to pay off, such as energy efficiency and carbon capture and storage.

While there is still a long way to go, it’s important to remember that progress is possible. We just need to continue working together toward a low-carbon future.

1 Comment

Leave a Reply

Previous Story

GOP ADS CRY “CRIME!” BUT HOMICIDES ARE ACTUALLY FALLING

Next Story

A Central Park Summer Fantasy Under the Minton Tiles

Latest from Assorted Ideas

0 $0.00
%d bloggers like this: